Book Review: Deadly Force: Understanding your Right to Self Defense by Massad Ayoob

This is, absolutely, one of the two must-read books on the topic of self-defense law.  If an individual will read only a single book on the legal use of deadly force, I think the Law of Self-Defense, by Andrew Branca, is the obvious choice as it is specifically written to be clear and concise for the average non-attorney.  With that said, I am very fond of this book, penned by Massad Ayoob, because it offers many lessons drawn directly from his extensive experience as an expert witness in use-of-force cases that really bring the realities of the judicial system to life.  If you are a serious student in the discipline of personal protection, this is a must read.

Massad Ayoob is the pre-eminent figure in the study of self-defense law among armed citizens.  He is, absolutely, the single individual that began a movement among motivated self-defense practitioners to understand the law.  Although not an attorney, his many decades working as an expert witness in use-of-force cases has led him to be the go-to expert on the subject, and he was doing extensive work in this field before the now-recognized attorneys who are involved in the craft.

Ayoob addresses the concepts of self-defense law in great detail in this book, but he brings them to life when relating first-hand experiences in the courtroom.  The dynamics involved when a jury of regular people are compelled to analyze a situation and hold the defendant accountable are complex and emotional.  While there are other books that provide good overview of the law itself, this book brings it to life.

You need to read this one.

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